Tuesday, May 28, 2019

The New Hazardous Waste: Electronic Waste Essay -- Technology Technol

The bleak Hazardous eat Electronic Waste Technology has opened human initiation to greater ideas and issueledge than we ever thought was possible. Technological advances in everything from care for to the distribution of education have made for a better and more cheery life. Computers and the use of the internet has created a global net track down in which the great unwashed half-way across the globe from each other can communicate and share information instantaneously. In 1965 Gordon Moore, one of the founding members of the Intel corporation, observed and proclaimed that the processing top executive of computers was doubling every 18 months. Labeled as Moores Law, this trend continues to this day. This legality and the mindset that everyone needs the newest fastest sharpest computer has created a global dubious waste difficulty predicted to be the largest toxic waste problem of the 21st century.1 The problem commonly referred to as electronic waste, or e-wast e, consists of the hazardous materials and plastics that computers and other electronic items are made of. Being that this is such a relatively new problem, non many people outside of those in large electronic companies, those who work in landfills, and people overseas in China, Indonesia, and other Asian countries where the waste is shipped know of the problem. If the worlds population is not educated and recycling or reuse programs are not initiated, catastrophe on a global direct is possible. Few steps have been made to solve this problem, and the question of who is responsible, the consumer or the producer, is a valid and interesting topic to be explored. Come along as the hazardous world of e-waste is explored with background, as well as solutions and ideas for the future. ... ...eek, 4/16/2001, Vol. 8 distinguish 15, p46.4. Gawel, Richard. Groups Aim to Make Molehill Out of Mountain of Electronic Waste. Electronic Design, 02/19/2001, Vol. 19 hump 4, p34.5. Bartholo mew, Doug. Computer Makers Tackle E-Waste. diligence Week/IW, Jan2004, Vol. 253 Issue 1, p60, 1pOther ResourcesCrozier, Ry. Passing the Buck. Electronic News (North America), 7/28/2003, Vol. 49 Issue 30.E-Waste Reuse. Industry Week/IW, Jan2003, Vol. 252 Issue 1, p19.Elgin, Ben. The Information Ages Toxic Garbage. Business Week, 10/6/2003 Issue 3852, p54.Long Awaited Electronic Waste Recycling opening move is Approved. Professional Engineering, 4/17/2002, Vol. 15 Issue 7, p5.NSWMA Adopts e-Waste Disposal weapons platform. Professional Safety, Nov2003, Vol. 48 Issue 11.Paper, Plastic, Or TV? Environment, Sep2002, Vol. 44 Issue 7, p7 The New Hazardous Waste Electronic Waste Essay -- Technology TechnolThe New Hazardous Waste Electronic Waste Technology has opened human existence to greater ideas and knowledge than we ever thought was possible. Technological advances in everything from medicine to the distribution of information have made for a better an d more convenient life. Computers and the use of the internet has created a global network in which people half-way across the globe from each other can communicate and share information instantaneously. In 1965 Gordon Moore, one of the founding members of the Intel corporation, observed and proclaimed that the processing power of computers was doubling every 18 months. Labeled as Moores Law, this trend continues to this day. This law and the mindset that everyone needs the newest fastest sharpest computer has created a global hazardous waste problem predicted to be the largest toxic waste problem of the 21st century.1 The problem commonly referred to as electronic waste, or e-waste, consists of the hazardous materials and plastics that computers and other electronic items are made of. Being that this is such a relatively new problem, not many people outside of those in large electronic companies, those who work in landfills, and people overseas in China, Indonesia, and other Asian countries where the waste is shipped know of the problem. If the worlds population is not educated and recycling or reuse programs are not initiated, catastrophe on a global level is possible. Few steps have been made to solve this problem, and the question of who is responsible, the consumer or the producer, is a valid and interesting topic to be explored. Come along as the hazardous world of e-waste is explored with background, as well as solutions and ideas for the future. ... ...eek, 4/16/2001, Vol. 8 Issue 15, p46.4. Gawel, Richard. Groups Aim to Make Molehill Out of Mountain of Electronic Waste. Electronic Design, 02/19/2001, Vol. 19 Issue 4, p34.5. Bartholomew, Doug. Computer Makers Tackle E-Waste. Industry Week/IW, Jan2004, Vol. 253 Issue 1, p60, 1pOther ResourcesCrozier, Ry. Passing the Buck. Electronic News (North America), 7/28/2003, Vol. 49 Issue 30.E-Waste Reuse. Industry Week/IW, Jan2003, Vol. 252 Issue 1, p19.Elgin, Ben. The Information Ages Toxic Garbage. Business Week, 10/6/2003 Issue 3852, p54.Long Awaited Electronic Waste Recycling Initiative is Approved. Professional Engineering, 4/17/2002, Vol. 15 Issue 7, p5.NSWMA Adopts e-Waste Disposal Program. Professional Safety, Nov2003, Vol. 48 Issue 11.Paper, Plastic, Or TV? Environment, Sep2002, Vol. 44 Issue 7, p7

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